Forewarned is forearmed: harmonized approaches for early detection of potentially invasive pests and pathogens in sentinel plantings

Carmen Morales-Rodríguez , Sten Anslan , Marie-Anne Auger-Rozenberg , Sylvie Augustin , Yuri Baranchikov , Amani Bellahirech , Daiva Burokienė , Dovilė Čepukoit , Ejup Çota , Kateryna Davydenko , H. Tuğba Doğmuş Lehtijärvi , Rein Drenkhan , Tiia Drenkhan , René Eschen , Iva Franić , Milka Glavendekić , Maarten de Groot , Magdalena Kacprzyk , Marc Kenis , Natalia Kirichenko , Iryna Matsiakh , Dmitry L. Musolin , Justyna A. Nowakowska , Richard O’Hanlon , Simone Prospero , Alain Roques , Alberto Santini , Venche Talgø  , Leho Tedersoo , Anne Uimari , Andrea Vannini , Johanna Witzell , Steve Woodward , Antonios Zambounis , Michelle Cleary

Abstract

The number of invasive alien pest and pathogen species affecting ecosystem functioning, human health and economies has increased dramatically over the last decades. Discoveries of invasive pests and pathogens previously unknown to science or with unknown host associations yet damaging on novel hosts highlights the necessity of developing novel tools to predict their appearance in hitherto naïve environments. The use of sentinel plant systems is a promising tool to improve the detection of pests and pathogens before introduction and to provide valuable information for the development of preventative measures to minimize economic or environmental impacts. Though sentinel plantings have been established and studied during the last decade, there still remains a great need for guidance on which tools and protocols to put into practice in order to make assessments accurate and reliable. The sampling and diagnostic protocols chosen should enable as much information as possible about potential damaging agents and species identification. Consistency and comparison of results are based on the adoption of common procedures for sampling design and sample processing. In this paper, we suggest harmonized procedures that should be used in sentinel planting surveys for effective sampling and identification of potential pests and pathogens. We also review the benefits and limitations of various diagnostic methods for early detection in sentinel systems, and the feasibility of the results obtained supporting National Plant Protection Organizations in pest and commodity risk analysis.
Author Carmen Morales-Rodríguez
Carmen Morales-Rodríguez,,
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, Sten Anslan
Sten Anslan,,
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, Marie-Anne Auger-Rozenberg
Marie-Anne Auger-Rozenberg,,
-
, Sylvie Augustin
Sylvie Augustin,,
-
, Yuri Baranchikov
Yuri Baranchikov,,
-
, Amani Bellahirech
Amani Bellahirech,,
-
, Daiva Burokienė
Daiva Burokienė,,
-
, Dovilė Čepukoit
Dovilė Čepukoit,,
-
, Ejup Çota
Ejup Çota,,
-
, Kateryna Davydenko
Kateryna Davydenko,,
-
et al.`
Journal seriesNeoBiota, ISSN 1619-0033, e-ISSN 1314-2488, (N/A 140 pkt)
Issue year2019
Vol47
Pages95-123
Publication size in sheets1.4
Keywords in Englishalien invasive pests and pathogens, commodity risk analysis, early warning, sampling techniques, sentinel plants, pest risk analysis, prediction
Keywords in original languagealien invasive pests and pathogens, commodity risk analysis, early warning, sampling techniques, sentinel plants, pest risk analysis, prediction
ASJC Classification1103 Animal Science and Zoology; 1104 Aquatic Science; 1105 Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics; 1109 Insect Science; 1110 Plant Science; 2302 Ecological Modelling; 2303 Ecology
Abstract in original languageThe number of invasive alien pest and pathogen species affecting ecosystem functioning, human health and economies has increased dramatically over the last decades. Discoveries of invasive pests and pathogens previously unknown to science or with unknown host associations yet damaging on novel hosts highlights the necessity of developing novel tools to predict their appearance in hitherto naïve environments. The use of sentinel plant systems is a promising tool to improve the detection of pests and pathogens before introduction and to provide valuable information for the development of preventative measures to minimize economic or environmental impacts. Though sentinel plantings have been established and studied during the last decade, there still remains a great need for guidance on which tools and protocols to put into practice in order to make assessments accurate and reliable. The sampling and diagnostic protocols chosen should enable as much information as possible about potential damaging agents and species identification. Consistency and comparison of results are based on the adoption of common procedures for sampling design and sample processing. In this paper, we suggest harmonized procedures that should be used in sentinel planting surveys for effective sampling and identification of potential pests and pathogens. We also review the benefits and limitations of various diagnostic methods for early detection in sentinel systems, and the feasibility of the results obtained supporting National Plant Protection Organizations in pest and commodity risk analysis.
DOIDOI:10.3897/neobiota.47.34276
URL https://neobiota.pensoft.net/article/34276/
Languageen angielski
Score (nominal)140
Score sourcejournalList
Publication indicators WoS Citations = 1; Scopus SNIP (Source Normalised Impact per Paper): 2017 = 1.175; WoS Impact Factor: 2018 = 2.488 (2)
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