The Impact of Different Management Scenarios on the Availability of Potential Forest Habitats for Wildlife on a Landscape Level: The Case of the Black Stork Ciconia nigra (Linnaeus, 1758)

Jan Banaś , Stanisław Zięba , Małgorzata Bujoczek , Leszek Bujoczek

Abstract

This study analyzed the effects of various forest management scenarios on habitats of the black stork, which has very specific requirements: it needs extensive forest complexes with a significant proportion of old trees for nesting, and bodies of water for foraging. The relationship between different forest management scenarios and the presence of black storks was examined in a large forest complex (9641 ha of managed stands) surrounded by wetland areas. A simulation of forest development under three management regimes was performed for eighteen 10-year periods. Management scenarios differed in terms of the species composition of stands, rotation age, retention tree areas, and silvicultural treatments. The basic scenario was characterized by a species composition consistent with natural-type stands, but with higher proportions of Scots pine and oak, with rotation ages of 100 and 140 years, respectively, managed by the shelterwood system. The productive scenario featured monospecific stands with a dominance of Scots pine with a rotation age of 90 years, harvested by clearcutting. Finally, the long rotation scenario introduced mixed tree stands with a long rotation age (110 and 180 years for Scots pine and oak, respectively). As compared to the basic scenario, the total harvest volume was greater by 14.6% in the productive scenario and smaller by 16.2% in the long rotation scenario. The availability of habitats for black stork changed as a result of different species compositions and age structures of tree stands. A considerable decrease in rotation age (below 100 years) and the elimination of oak trees from stands in the productive scenario adversely affected potential habitats for black stork. On the other hand, the factors favorable to black stork habitats were a long rotation age, the presence of oak in stands, the application of shelterwood cutting, and the use of retention trees in the long rotation scenario. This scenario would probably also benefit other bird species legally protected under the European Union’s Birds Directive.
Author Jan Banaś (FoF / IoFRM / DoFDGaEoF)
Jan Banaś,,
- DEPARTMENT OF FOREST DEVICES, GEOMATICS AND ECONOMICS OF FORESTRY
, Stanisław Zięba (FoF / IoFRM / DoFDGaEoF)
Stanisław Zięba,,
- DEPARTMENT OF FOREST DEVICES, GEOMATICS AND ECONOMICS OF FORESTRY
, Małgorzata Bujoczek (FoF / IoEaS / DBL)
Małgorzata Bujoczek,,
- DEPOSIT BIOGENIC DEPARTMENT
, Leszek Bujoczek (FoF / IoFRM / DoFDGaEoF)
Leszek Bujoczek,,
- DEPARTMENT OF FOREST DEVICES, GEOMATICS AND ECONOMICS OF FORESTRY
Journal seriesForests, ISSN 1999-4907, (N/A 100 pkt)
Issue year2019
Vol10
No5
Pages1-21
Publication size in sheets1
Article number362
Keywords in Englishmultifunctional forestry; biodiversity; management intensity; rotation age; nesting trees; nesting site; landscape; Natura 2000
Keywords in original languagemultifunctional forestry; biodiversity; management intensity; rotation age; nesting trees; nesting site; landscape; Natura 2000
ASJC Classification1107 Forestry
Abstract in original languageThis study analyzed the effects of various forest management scenarios on habitats of the black stork, which has very specific requirements: it needs extensive forest complexes with a significant proportion of old trees for nesting, and bodies of water for foraging. The relationship between different forest management scenarios and the presence of black storks was examined in a large forest complex (9641 ha of managed stands) surrounded by wetland areas. A simulation of forest development under three management regimes was performed for eighteen 10-year periods. Management scenarios differed in terms of the species composition of stands, rotation age, retention tree areas, and silvicultural treatments. The basic scenario was characterized by a species composition consistent with natural-type stands, but with higher proportions of Scots pine and oak, with rotation ages of 100 and 140 years, respectively, managed by the shelterwood system. The productive scenario featured monospecific stands with a dominance of Scots pine with a rotation age of 90 years, harvested by clearcutting. Finally, the long rotation scenario introduced mixed tree stands with a long rotation age (110 and 180 years for Scots pine and oak, respectively). As compared to the basic scenario, the total harvest volume was greater by 14.6% in the productive scenario and smaller by 16.2% in the long rotation scenario. The availability of habitats for black stork changed as a result of different species compositions and age structures of tree stands. A considerable decrease in rotation age (below 100 years) and the elimination of oak trees from stands in the productive scenario adversely affected potential habitats for black stork. On the other hand, the factors favorable to black stork habitats were a long rotation age, the presence of oak in stands, the application of shelterwood cutting, and the use of retention trees in the long rotation scenario. This scenario would probably also benefit other bird species legally protected under the European Union’s Birds Directive.
DOIDOI:10.3390/f10050362
URL https://www.mdpi.com/1999-4907/10/5/362
Languageen angielski
LicenseJournal (articles only); author's original; Uznanie Autorstwa (CC-BY); after publication
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The Impact of Different Management Scenarios on the Availability of Potential Forest Habitats for Wildlife on a Landscape Level: The Case of the Black Stork Ciconia nigra (Linnaeus, 1758) of 23-09-2019
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Score (nominal)100
Score sourcejournalList
Publication indicators WoS Citations = 0; Scopus SNIP (Source Normalised Impact per Paper): 2018 = 0.943; WoS Impact Factor: 2018 = 2.116 (2) - 2018=2.453 (5)
Citation count*
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FinansowanieThis study was financed by the Ministry of Science and Higher Education of the Republic of Poland
Wkład autorówConceptualization, J.B.; Methodology, J.B., M.B. and L.B.; Software, S.Z. and J.B.; Validation, J.B., M.B. and L.B.; Formal analysis, S.Z., Investigation, J.B., M.B., S.Z. and L.B.; Writing—Original draft preparation, J.B. and M.B.; Writing—Review and editing, M.B., L.B. and S.Z.; Visualization, J.B. and S.Z.; Supervision, M.B. and L.B.
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* presented citation count is obtained through Internet information analysis and it is close to the number calculated by the Publish or Perish system.
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